Category Archives: Clean Air

Laura Spanijan and Matthew Tejada

15th Sep 2010

Recycling, compost, farmers markets, home gardens, air quality, alternative energy technology, education…Houston’s path to sustainable growth.

Join us in conversation with Laura Spanijan, City of Houston’s Director of Sustainability and Matthew Tejada, Executive Director, Air Alliance Houston.

City of Houston Sustainability
http://www.greenhoustontx.gov/index.html

“Environmental activities within the City’s own operations and in the community are coordinated by the Mayor’s Office. The Health and Human Services Department contains an environmental division that is responsible for ensuring community-wide environmental quality in the areas of air and water quality, food safety, occupational health, children’s health, and animal protection. Public Works, Solid Waste, Planning, Police, Fire, Legal, Building Services, Parks and Recreation departments, and Houston Airport System also include environmental staffs, which manage issues relating to each department’s work. The Mayor’s Office works with all of these environmental specialists on a regular basis. Once a month, we convene a citywide meeting of the senior environmental staff to ensure full and open communication among all city personnel charged with responsibility for our environment.”

Air Alliance Houston – formerly G.H.A.S.P. and Mothers for Clean air
www.airalliancehouston,org

“We focus on the adverse effects of Houston area air pollution, particularly on children’s health. We continue to develop community programs to address environmental justice issues and to educate children and adults in local communities about air quality issues and prevention of exposure. We educate communities with plays, film, and interactive theater, in particular Ozone Theater, which teaches young students about air pollution—its sources, effects on health and what they can do about it.”

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Mary Wood and Patsy Gillham

25th Aug 2010

“Litter travels from all corners of Texas into our storm drains and waterways until it reaches the Gulf of Mexico. The mission of the Texas Bottle Bill is to stop the unnecessary and improper disposal of valuable resources and to help create jobs for our communities here in Texas.”

How are two women taking action?
What is a part of the solution?

Join us in an important conversation with Mary Wood and Patsy Gillham, creators of the Texas Bottle Bill. “The mission of the Texas Bottle Bill is to establish a deposit/refund program to decrease the volume of aluminum, glass and plastic beverage containers in our lakes and rivers; bays and bayous; on our roadways and public lands. The deposit/refund system will combine financial incentives and convenient redemption centers; this along with curbside collection will ensure the maximum number of beverage containers for recycling. This Texas Bottle Bill will establish a funding base to create jobs locally and throughout the state in the recycling industry and bring processors and manufactures into our state. The Texas Bottle Bill will reduce Texans carbon footprint by increasing the supply of high quality materials for recycling and help replace the practice of using virgin material to produce new products.”

http://www.texasbottlebill.com/

http://www.plasticpollutiontexas.com/

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James Rhubottom, Jr.

Wed 27th Jan 2010

James Rhubottom, Jr., Operations Leader for the Mobile Laboratory Program and Chemist IV, City of Houston Health & Human Services.

From the inside of what looks like a modified ambulance, environmental investigator James Rhubottom sits behind a computer station that could be straight from Mission Control. He longs for the day when he is out of a job, Rhubottom said. And not because he is lazy. Being out of a job means the Houston area has clean, quality air. Until then, he is part of a team of chemists who patrol the area, measuring toxins in the air from a mobile air quality unit. Through grant funds from the Houston Endowment and the mayor’s initiative to lower toxins in Houston’s air, Rhubottom and the Mobile Ambient Air Monitoring Laboratory study the area’s air. “MAAML is an outreach of the mayor’s initiative allowing us to add services that the city has not previously had, “ he said. “We go to various locations, take air samples and report if there are any potential problems.” AND the Farm Report. Local farmers, what’s in the fields and at YOUR Farmers Markets.

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Brian Herod and Lawrence Spence

Wed 20th Jan 2010

Brian Herod and his association with Japhet Creek Restoration.

CLEAN CREEK COALITION – To Help With the Restoration of Japhet Creek The Japhet Creek Restoration project’s mission is to restore the natural beauty of Japhet Creek. This creek is one of the few tributaries to Buffalo Bayou north of the bayou. Its spring fed waters have been a dumping ground for years. For decades, polluters have thrown cement blocks, tires, scrap metal, and small trash into the creek. In November 2004, the Japhet Civic Association decided to clean up the creek and restore this natural habitat for red tailed hawks, night herons, red-eared slider turtles and the many other species that make this creek their homes. Teams have removed over 425 bags of trash, 215 tires and 2600 pounds of scrap metal. We have expanded our collaborations to include Buffalo Bayou Partnership, Bayou Preservation Association, and Keep Houston Beautiful. Groups that have attended include members of the Permaculture Guild of Houston, school groups, corporate volunteers and many other concerned and responsible Houstonians who want to see this natural gem preserved. We appreciate everyone’s help and can always use more.

Visitors may also participate in always-changing programming that includes nature journals, water quality testing, decomposition bservations, soil type explorations, home environmental awareness inventory logs, bird feeders and many more activities that can be used in the exhibit areas or even taken home for further backyard experiences!

AND:

Lawrence Spence, educator and one of the sponsors of the Houston Environmental Education Summit.

Third Annual HISD Sustainability Education Summit Date: January 23, 2010 Location: One Main Street, Houston, Texas, 77002 The event, co-sponsored by the National Wildlife Federation, Houston Independent School District, and the Environmental Educators’ Exchange (EEE), will be exploring how the growing national movement to “green up” our schools can help students achieve at their highest levels. Come see how you can help educate our children for the challenges of this century. Speakers include Kevin Coyle, Jim Blackburn, and Robin Moore, Ph.D. Hands-on activities and exhibits will be available as well as field tours after the summit. Attendance is free. Link to registration and summit agenda (available mid-December): online.nwf.org/houstonee09 or visit www.houstonsyh.org

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Lynnsey Dohmen, educator for the EcoStation at the Childrens Museum, Houston.

Wed 13th Jan 2010

we welcome in conversation… Lynnsey Dohmen, educator for the EcoStation at the Childrens Museum, Houston. www.cmhouston.org/ecostation

“EcoStation is an active, outdoor/indoor environmental exhibit where visitors engage in ecological studies and explore environmental issues by visiting a native plant garden, a woodland area, the bayou table, the pond, and a research pavilion. Through these and several other exhibit areas, visitors can participate in diverse hands-on activities such as stream bed creation, insect collecting, tree rubbings, footprint identification, and more!

Visitors may also participate in always-changing programming that includes nature journals, water quality testing, decomposition bservations, soil type explorations, home environmental awareness inventory logs, bird feeders and many more activities that can be used in the exhibit areas or even taken home for further backyard experiences!

AND:

Rowan TwoSisters, Urban Rancher, getting “chicky”, teaching folks about raising chickens in the city. www.mac.com/getcultured
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