Category Archives: Farming

Our conversation centers around the now that wreaks of Our future: farming and peak oil.

Eco-Ology, Wednesday, July 13 2011

Our conversation centers around the now that wreaks of Our future: farming and peak oil.

Is farming en masse a viable opportunity?

What are the prospects of future fuels as we slide down the curve of peak oil?

Join us in conversation with Stacey Roussel, wife, mother, farmer.  Stacey left corporate America to feed her soul and nourish our bodies with delicious fresh produce grown on her land with her family.  What challenges has she faced?
http://allweneedfarms.com/

Peak oil, what are alternatives?  What conversations are relevant right now?  What questions could we ask that can assist in the change we want to see?
Mark Juedeman, co-founder of Transition Houston, http://www.transitionhouston.org/

“Transition Houston is an optimistic and energetic response to the dual challenges of climate change and peak oil at the local level. The Transition Movement supports the transition from oil dependency to local resilience by equipping communities with creative adaptations in areas such as food, energy, health, education, spirit and economy to generate a road map towards sustainable living.
Transition Houston serves to build on the wisdom of the existing resources in Houston’s diverse community to inspire, network and train localized communities to consider and adapt Rob Hopkins’ transition model. Together we can unite pools of ingenuity and skills to unleash the collective genius of our own people in finding self-determined solutions.”

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Craig Stewart

4th Aug 2010

This week. “if you tell a Texan he can’t do something, he’ll come back with a chuckle and say, “I’ll show You.” Join us in conversation with Craig Stewart, Farmer. From a successful career in photography to being a successful lavender and olive farmer is a road with many steps. Craig’s story is an inspiration. http://www.lavandetexas.com

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C. J. Claverie, Mickey Morales, Kathy Sullivan and Lisa Seger

10th Feb 2010

From the World Health Organization http://www.who.int/trade/glossary/story028/en/ “Food security is built on three pillars: Food availability: sufficient quantities of food available on a consistent basis. Food access: having sufficient resources to obtain appropriate foods for a nutritious diet. Food use: appropriate use based on knowledge of basic nutrition and care, as well as adequate water and sanitation.” Join us in conversation with: C. J. Claverie, Manager of Houston Farmers Market at Rice University www.houstonfarmersmarket.org Mickey Morales, Manager of Highland Village Farmers Market http://www.hvfm.com AND purveyor of coffees from Katz Coffee www.katzcoffee.com Kathy Sullivan, Local Farmer, Naturopath, and long time supporter of organic and sustainable farming practice Lisa Seger, Blue Heron Farm – spoiled goats, fresh cheese! http://blueherontexas.com/
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Dr. Neil Carman and Wendy Reed: Bzzzzzzzzzzz….

Sep 2nd 2009

Bees, pollinators, insecticides, food, Our future. The EPA has established a multidisciplinary Pollinator Protection Team, which has developed a strategic plan that reflects the importance of pollinators to human health and the environment. The study/plan is scheduled for completion in 2014.

Join us in an interview with Dr. Neil Carman, Clean air Director, chemist with the Lone Star Chapter of the Sierra Club, and member of the Genetic Engineering Committee. “Neonicotinoids have been quantified in the nectar and the pollen of plants. These pesticides can not only kill honey bees outright, but also the honey bees’ ability to fight off infections may also be comprised,” said Dr Neil Carman, Sierra Club Genetic Engineering Committee member. “Federal agencies in France and Germany have already taken responsible regulatory actions to suspend use of these pesticides based on the best available scientific evidence, but the EPA is moving too slowly to take action to suspend nicotinyl pesticides,” more

Wendy Reed of Reed Honey Farm, the family business of Wendy, Kenny, and their daughter. It began with one hive, and they now manage thousands of colonies of honeybees.

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Dr. Ron Sass, PhD

Mon Oct 13th 2008

Join us for a conversation with Dr. Ron Sass about the environmental and ecological effects of hurricanes including Hurricane Ike and some more on carbon footprint. Dr. Ron Sass, PhD – Professor Emeritus Rice University Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. In the ’80s, Sass decided he needed a change, and in 1986 he began to look at Earth systems. He soon became involved with the IPCC, set up in 1988 by the United Nations to investigate global warming. Sass led the committee that studied methane emissions from rice paddies, natural wetlands and landfills, primarily from the bacterial decomposition of organic matter, the largest natural source of methane in the atmosphere. (Man-made sources of methane, such as the burning of fossil fuels and cattle ranching, release far more of the gas.) A physical chemist by training, Sass coordinated the efforts of scientists in Thailand, Indonesia, Germany, the Philippines, Japan, China and Australia to measure and halt natural methane emissions. You can stop it completely, actually, he said of the process by which methane escapes rice paddies when they are flooded. The bacteria go dormant when you remove the water. When you reflood it, you’ve got about a three-week period before (the bacteria) really start cranking up again. So timing is critical, he said. You can cut (emissions) down significantly 50 to 60 percent would be fairly simple. His research led to the IPCC’s method for estimating greenhouse gas emissions without fieldwork. Poor countries don’t have enough scientists to go around, said Sass, who has spent significant time wading through rice paddies in China.

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